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Admissions

Admissions Information

Duke Divinity School is a fully accredited member of the Association of Theological Schools (ATS) and is one of thirteen accredited seminaries of the United Methodist Church. It considers candidates for admission to the master of divinity, master of arts in Christian practice, and master of theological studies programs who hold a bachelor’s degree, or its equivalent, from a college or university approved by a regional accrediting body. It considers candidates for admission to the master of theology program who hold a bachelor’s degree, or its equivalent, from a college or university approved by a regional accrediting body and who have or will have been awarded the master of divinity degree, or the equivalent, from an accredited ATS institution. Candidates for admission to the doctor of ministry and the doctor of theology programs must hold a bachelor’s degree, or its equivalent, from a college or university approved by a regional accrediting body and a master of divinity, a master of theological studies, or comparable master’s degree (e.g., MA in theology, MRE, MCM, etc.) from an accredited ATS institution.

Pre-seminary Curriculum

The Divinity School follows the guidelines of the Association of Theological Schools with respect to undergraduate preparation for theological study. In general, these guidelines prescribe a strong background in liberal arts, especially the humanities. A well-rounded background in English language and literature, history, philosophy, psychology, religion, social science, and foreign languages is especially desirable.

Professional and Technical Standards for Admission

To fulfill the role and purpose of Duke Divinity School, all candidates applying for admission must meet the requirements and expectations of the school’s curriculum. A student needs a specific set of minimum attributes to succeed. All students, including those with reasonable accommodations, must meet the requirements and expectations listed below. The Committee on Admissions adheres to the Divinity School's Professional and Technical Standards during the selection of persons applying for entry to the school. Questions regarding these standards may be directed to the Office of Admissions.

Statement of Diversity in Admissions

Duke Divinity School seeks to build a diverse and inclusive community consistent with the scriptural vision that: “There is no longer Jew or Greek, there is no longer slave or free, there is no longer male and female: for all of you are one in Christ Jesus” (Galatians 3:28). It is in this light that, as part of its mission to prepare leaders for the church, the academy, and the world, the Divinity School is committed to the importance of diversity. At a practical level, the Divinity School recognizes the need to prepare students for ministry, teaching, and leadership in multicultural and multi-faith contexts, whether in the United States or elsewhere. To do this well, the Divinity School community must seek to wrestle with and embody diversity in its faculty, staff, and student body. Given the historical legacies, social locations, and confessional commitments of the Divinity School, diversity in this context is particularly focused on gender, race, ethnicity, socioeconomic background, denominational affiliation, age, sexual orientation, learning styles, and physical ability. Encountering and learning alongside a diversity of persons offers opportunities for members of the Divinity community to deepen their understanding of themselves, society, and their roles as pastors, ministers, teachers, and leaders. Attention to and inclusion of diversity helps foster more faithful, hopeful, and loving forms of common life. Furthermore, a diverse faculty, staff, and student body helps generate an environment for deeper and broader theological reflection and formation. The Divinity School believes that students who have the opportunity to interact with many varied perspectives and backgrounds will be better prepared to address fruitfully the historical legacies of injustice and conflict where they serve; critically and sensitively engage the different cultural contexts they will encounter in their vocations after graduation; and be able to develop robust theological and pastoral responses to an ever-changing environment. A diverse and hospitable community opens up more opportunities for potentially transformational experiences that assist students in developing the skills necessary to serve a multi-cultural, multi-ethnic, multi-racial, multi-faith world with integrity and wisdom. As part of its mission, Duke Divinity School seeks to foster a cohesive theological vision that is neither narrow nor homogeneous—one that is deeply rooted in critical engagement with scripture and honors a range of theological traditions in conversation with a plurality of historical, geographic, and social settings.